Idle Wanderings

Sign of a constant daydreamer with a mind as scattered as Dory

135,465 notes

accountingbros:

aliasofwestgate:

justira:

Reblogging not just because special effects are cool but because body doubles, stunt doubles, acting doubles, talent doubles — all the people whose faces we’re not supposed to see but whose bodies make movies and tv shows possible — these people need and deserve more recognition. We see their bodies onscreen, delight in the shape and motion of those bodies, but even as we pick apart everything else that goes on both on and behind the screen, I just don’t see the people who are those bodies getting the love and recognition they deserve.

We’re coming to love and recognize actors who work in full-body makeup/costumes, such as Andy Serkis, or actors whose entire performances, or large chunks thereof, are motion captured or digitized (lately sometimes also Andy Serkis!). But people like Leander Deeny play an enormous part in making characters such as Steve Rogers come to life, too. Body language is a huge part of a performance and of characterization. For characters/series with a lot of action, a stunt person can have a huge influence on how we read and interpret a character, such as the influence Heidi Moneymaker has had on the style and choreography of Black Widow’s signature fighting style. Talent doubles breathe believability and discipline-specific nuance into demanding storylines.

Actors are creative people themselves, and incredibly important in building the characters we see onscreen. But if we agree that they’re more than dancing monkeys who just do whatever the directors/writers say, then we have to agree that doubles are more than that, too. Doubles make creative decisions too, and often form strong, mutually supportive relationship with actors.

image image

Image 1: “I would like to thank Kathryn Alexandre, the most generous actor I’ve ever worked opposite.”

Image 2: “Kathryn who’s playing my double who’s incredible.”

[ Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany on her acting double, Kathryn Alexandre, two images from a set on themarysue, via lifeofkj ]

image image

image image

I’ve got a relationship that goes back many, many years with Dave. And I would hate for people to just see that image of me and Dave and go, “oh, there’s Dan Radcliffe with a person in a wheelchair.” Because I would never even for a moment want them to assume that Dave was anything except for an incredibly important person in my life.

[ Daniel Radcliffe talking about David Holmes, his stunt double for 2001-2009, who was paralysed while working on the Harry Potter films. David Holmes relates his story here. Gifset via smeagoled ]

With modern tv- and film-making techniques, many characters are composite creations. The characters we see onscreen or onstage have always been team efforts, with writers, directors, makeup artists, costume designers, special effects artists, production designers, and many other people all contributing to how a character is ultimately realized in front of us. Many different techniques go into something like the creation of Skinny Steve — he’s no more all Leander Deeny than he is all Chris Evans.

But as fandom dissects the anatomy of scenes in ever-increasing detail to get at microexpressions and the minutiae of body language, let’s recognize the anatomy in the scenes, too. I don’t mean to take away from the work Chris Evans or any other actors do (he is an amazing Steve Rogers and I love him tons), but fandom needs to do better in recognizing the bodies, the other people, who make up the characters we love and some of our very favourite shots of them. Chris Evans has an amazing body, but so does Leander Deeny — that body is beautiful; that body mimicked Chris Evans’s motions with amazing, skilled precision; that body moved Steve Rogers with emotion and grace and character.

Fandom should do better than productions and creators who fail to be transparent about the doubles in their productions. On the screen, suspension of disbelief is key and the goal is to make all the effort that went into the production vanish and leave only the product itself behind. But when the film is over and the episode ends, let’s remember everyone who helped make that happen.

image

[ Sam Hargrave (stunt double for Chris Evans) and James Young (stunt double for Sebastian Stan, and fight choreographer), seen from behind, exchange a fistbump while in costume on the set of Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Image via lifeofkj ]

I applaud these guys as much as the suit actors in my japanese tokusatsu shows. They do just as much work. 

Let us not forget voice doubles, but yes to all this, being a double is hard work and you are at your best if no one can tell the difference between you and the actor.

(Source: stark-industries-rnd, via johanen)

Filed under Acting george bts

12,293 notes

My mother once told me that trauma is like Lord of the Rings. You go through this crazy, life-altering thing that almost kills you (like say having to drop the one ring into Mount Doom), and that thing by definition cannot possibly be understood by someone who hasn’t gone through it. They can sympathize sure, but they’ll never really know, and more than likely they’ll expect you to move on from the thing fairly quickly. And they can’t be blamed, people are just like that, but that’s not how it works.

Some lucky people are like Sam. They can go straight home, get married, have a whole bunch of curly headed Hobbit babies and pick up their gardening right where they left off, content to forget the whole thing and live out their days in peace. Lots of people however, are like Frodo, and they don’t come home the same person they were when they left, and everything is more horrible and more hard then it ever was before. The old wounds sting and the ghost of the weight of the one ring still weighs heavy on their minds, and they don’t fit in at home anymore, so they get on boats go sailing away to the Undying West to look for the sort of peace that can only come from within. Frodos can’t cope, and most of us are Frodos when we start out.

But if we move past the urge to hide or lash out, my mother always told me, we can become Pippin and Merry. They never ignored what had happened to them, but they were malleable and receptive to change. They became civic leaders and great storytellers; they we able to turn all that fear and anger and grief into narratives that others could delight in and learn from, and they used the skills they had learned in battle to protect their homeland. They were fortified by what had happened to them, they wore it like armor and used it to their advantage.

It is our trauma that turns us into guardians, my mother told me, it is suffering that strengthens our skin and softens our hearts, and if we learn to live with the ghosts of what had been done to us, we just may be able to save others from the same fate.

S.T.Gibson  (via modernhepburn)

First time I’ve ever heard the advice, “be more like Pippin.”

(via padnick)

LotR was meant as an analogy for what it was like to go through war and come home, so this metaphor was absolutely intentional on the author’s part.

(via vampmissedith)

(Source: sarahtaylorgibson, via johanen)

Filed under life trauma

150 notes

deheerkonijn:

Some Station Wagon AU for my Week 2 Bonus post for Pthon.
They’re dawdling on the side of the road coming back from a concert because they don’t want to go home quite yet. The car is named Kilgharrah, obvs. It’s crappy and banged up, and the back left window doesn’t roll up all the way (you don’t even have auto windows, Merlin!!), but it was his dad’s and Merlin loves it. 
It breaks down at least twice a year, and Arthur inevitably has to go find Merlin stranded on the side of the road in the pouring rain, but still Merlin insists that he doesn’t want to buy another one. When Kilgharrah eventually dies for real, and no amount of whacking around in the engine can bring him back, Arthur pretends that he doesn’t see Merlin tearing up a bit as it’s loaded up onto the tow truck and taken away to the scrap yard. (“But the back seat was just so good for fucking in; it was so roomy" Merlin sniffles reminiscently)("There there," Arthur says, "We’ll get you a new car that’s just as ridiculous")And that’s the origin story of Aithusa, the powder blue Prius. Her back seat is decidedly not any good for fumbling around in, but saving the environment is more important, Arthur.

Voting for Week 1 is still going on - you can check out all the great entries here!

deheerkonijn:

Some Station Wagon AU for my Week 2 Bonus post for Pthon.

They’re dawdling on the side of the road coming back from a concert because they don’t want to go home quite yet. The car is named Kilgharrah, obvs. It’s crappy and banged up, and the back left window doesn’t roll up all the way (you don’t even have auto windows, Merlin!!), but it was his dad’s and Merlin loves it. 

It breaks down at least twice a year, and Arthur inevitably has to go find Merlin stranded on the side of the road in the pouring rain, but still Merlin insists that he doesn’t want to buy another one. When Kilgharrah eventually dies for real, and no amount of whacking around in the engine can bring him back, Arthur pretends that he doesn’t see Merlin tearing up a bit as it’s loaded up onto the tow truck and taken away to the scrap yard. (“But the back seat was just so good for fucking in; it was so roomy" Merlin sniffles reminiscently)("There there," Arthur says, "We’ll get you a new car that’s just as ridiculous")

And that’s the origin story of Aithusa, the powder blue Prius. Her back seat is decidedly not any good for fumbling around in, but saving the environment is more important, Arthur.
Voting for Week 1 is still going on - you can check out all the great entries here!

(via writingupsidedown)

Filed under merlin fanart lovely

73 notes

Anonymous asked: Thank you for those comments about Island. It's a flawed film, yes, but the cinematography, music, and the performances are spot on. I also think Colin Morgan really likes playing complex, flawed, damaged, and, more often than not, somewhat unlikeable characters. I haven't watched Merlin, which seems to be the standard by which a lot of tumblr fans seem to judge him.

rocknvaughn:

I wholeheartedly agree with all of the above.

Yes, Island is a flawed film, but not nearly as bad as it was being made out to be. If anything, the storyline gets a bit muddled and lost. I mean, that might have been on purpose to illustrate Nikki’s unstable state of mind, but that plot device works much better in a book than it does onscreen. But Colin’s work in that movie was actually quite stellar.

I think you’re right about Colin liking to play complex, flawed, damaged and/or unlikable characters…but you forgot one other key component to that list: tragic.

It’s also understandable that a majority of his tumblr fans know him from Merlin and may expect him to play more roles in that vein. But if you look at his career the way that his CV does (with Merlin reduced to a one line blurb), the vast majority of what he’s done has been much more complicated and dark (warning, spoilers ahead):

Plays:

Nothing to Confess: This monologue he did as part of a play done at The Arches Theatre in Glasgow during his RSAMD days is certainly dark and the character flawed and, while he starts out likeable enough, by the time the monologue is over, the viewer is more horrified than anything else. He does amazingly well with his portrayal of a girlfriend-beater in denial.

Vernon God Little: His character did a lot of things he wasn’t supposed to do, but the one thing he didn’t do what what he was accused of, and he was executed for it. So, his character was decidedly gray, but his death was tragic.

All About My Mother: Another story where his character Esteban dies tragically and his mother goes on a quest to let his father know. The story that ensues finally brings us to where we meet Esteban’s father, who has been living as a transvestite for the past 20 years.

A Prayer for My Daughter: Jimmy Rosario was in custody, accused of murdering an old woman with his partner. He also was a drug addict. So, not exactly of the lily-white variety. There was also a part near the end of the play where he was full-on naked for an entire scene, and what ensued was way more suggestive (on the policeman’s part anyway) than anything they dreamt up against that jukebox in Mojo.

Our Private Life: Carlos is a depressive, compulsive liar and tries to blame his homosexuality in part on sexual abuse he received at the hands his father that he’s not sure whether he remembers. By the end of the play, we’re still not sure how much of Carlos’ tale is truth and how much of it is fiction.

The Tempest: This may actually be an exception to the rule, as Ariel’s plight is not all that tragic, as he is released by the end of the play. However, it is a play that Colin was intimately familiar with (having played Ferdinand in it while at RSAMD), and he was fulfilling one of his self-confessed acting dreams by performing at the Globe.

Mojo: So yes, let’s talk about Mojo. Yes, there was a lot of talk about the jukebox scene…but what many failed to recognize was the threat and malice and top-dog vs. little-dog adversarial power play going on throughout the whole play, but most especially then. And, moreover, that Baby had some legitimate reasons for feeling threatened by Skinny Luke.

Skinny was trying to set himself up as Mickey’s second-in-command in the way that Baby supposedly was to Ezra (and Baby paid for that position with the sexual abuse he suffered at his father’s hands). Skinny might not have known about the conspiracy against Ezra, but he was actively trying to discredit Baby in an effort to make himself more important.

And, while his death was tragic and sad, don’t forget that he was not a really likeable character, and in fact was antisemitic.

Television:

Jethro Cane: While being the only human on that craft that could keep up with the Doctor, he was also gave in to his more base emotions: he teased Sky while she was possessed, saying “Six six six!” just to make her repeat it. He also gave in to fear and peer pressure in the end and actively starts assisting his father and the Professor in trying to drag the Doctor out of the craft.

Jimmy Minor: While Jimmy showed an obvious care of and attraction to Phoebe, there was precious little else to recommend him. His manners were rather crude (eating, drinking, and smoking simultaneously or not knocking before entering April’s apartment). He makes fun of Isabelle’s age, April’s loose ways, and Patrick’s ethnicity. He laughs with the other coroner over the jumper’s death and concern about Phoebe’s closeness with Patrick comes off menacing instead of worried.

While he shows moments of being really human and caring (not wanting what he says about April to be repeated to Phoebe because he knows how Phoebe feels about their friend, comforting Patrick at the end after the details of April’s death are revealed), overall, Jimmy is a pretty self-serving guy and not that likable of a character.

Film:

Cathal O’Regan: It’s easy to remember that he was a fun and funny guy who ultimately made a big impact in a positive way in Fred’s life. However, he was still a guy who used drugs to compensate for what he couldn’t deal with and ended up committing suicide via drug overdose. Complex, dark, flawed, damaged, and tragic all apply in Cathal’s case.

Calum MacLeod: I went over this in my earlier post about Island, but…Calum may be simple-minded, but he also has a violent temper, and by the end of the movie, has forced sex on his half-sister (although at the time he didn’t know they were related AND she was encouraging him to like her) and kills his own mother in a fit of rage.

Victor “Tah” Richardson: We haven’t seen the movie yet, but as it is based on a real life biopic story, it is easy to figure out that this character easily falls under the helm of “tragic”.

One of a group of four men that Vera, the main character is close to (the others being her brother, her fiance, and another friend of theirs), he is there for her to lean on after her fiance’s death (the scene they were filming in Oxford). But the only reason why he is still in England at that time is because he contracted cerebrospinal meningitis, a disease that should have killed him but did not. This makes his death a year and a half later, after it looked like he would survive after being shot in the head and blinded particularly tragic.

Frankie Shea: This film hasn’t even finished shooting yet, but as it’s another biopic film, we are able to extrapolate some of what we will see. Frankie was certainly not an innocent. His father had made money running one of those crooked clubs in Soho in the 50’s. Frankie was a thief, and he also worked for Reggie Kray for several years. He was also the one responsible for introducing Reggie to his future wife, Frankie’s sister Frances.

How much of this we’ll see in the movie, I don’t know, but, after Frances leaves Reggie, moves back home and is hospitalized after trying to kill herself, she moves in with Frankie and his wife rather than back home with her parents. He is the one who discovers her after she commits suicide.

And even Merlin, which is the role for what Colin is best known for, is a very complex, flawed and somewhat dark character by the end.

If you can leave the whole “Merthur” thing out of the equation for a minute, Merlin had to do some pretty dreadful things in defence of Arthur and had to make some pretty awful decisions that changed him forever. The mistakes he made were HUGE and ultimately came back to haunt him. And the kind-hearted boy that believed the best in everyone was sadly gone by the end. He’d learned how to be ruthless. Say what you will, but Merlin utterly failed Morgana and helped make her what she was. If he had intervened early on as he had wanted to, then perhaps she might have been saved. He was also willing to forsake everything he was meant to do as Emrys (bring magic back) in order to ensure Mordred’s death. While that coin of judgement was given to Arthur, Merlin was being just as tested…and it was his failure that ultimately doomed his king.

And who would not consider Merlin being stuck on this earth, immortal and never able to get to his other half tragic?

Filed under Colin morgan thespian

51,691 notes

glockgal:

madlori:

Women firefighters douse flames during the Pearl Harbor attack.

Oh hay look women of colour were an integral part of the ‘cool’ part of history too, how about that.  They were like. Doing stuff that supposedly only heroic white dudes had done. That makes women valid participants in collective history now, right? Right? This is in high school history books now, right? Right? Huh?

glockgal:

madlori:

Women firefighters douse flames during the Pearl Harbor attack.

Oh hay look women of colour were an integral part of the ‘cool’ part of history too, how about that.  They were like. Doing stuff that supposedly only heroic white dudes had done. That makes women valid participants in collective history now, right? Right? This is in high school history books now, right? Right? Huh?

(via joy-forever)

Filed under History bamf women